In his house at R'lyeh, dead Cthulhu waits dreaming.

Archive for March, 2017

Suzy’s Bad Day: Wendig Challenge

P0000012821S0046T2.jpgThis week’s topic was about going against authority. This story started out that way, but didn’t end up really being about that at all. I’m not even sure what I intended to do with it at first, but I sort of just followed the lead character down a spiral.

The image to the right will make sense in a minute or so.

Story after the break.

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Pulp Appeal: Dashiell Hammett

Broadswords and Blasters

Continental Op CoverThe Continental Op from Cameron’s library

Dashiell Hammett lived the life of a hard-boiled detective before he created one of his own. His Continental Op character was one of the most popular detectives of the 1920s pulp fiction era. Hammett’s work with the Op and other characters appeared alongside such notable writers and characters as Erle Stanley Gardner’s Perry Mason and Raymond Chandler’s Philip Marlowe, among scores of others.

Unlike most of his contemporaries, or even many of the people who came after, Hammett has the distinction of having been a private detective, which lends his stories even more gravitas than his stripped down fiction and inclusion of grime and grit do alone. The Continental Op, the character he spent the most time writing about, is loosely based on his own experiences working for the Pinkerton Agency before and after the First World War. The Op is never named, nor…

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Do You Want the Sun to Rise Tomorrow? : Wendig Challenge

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Image CC-BY Kent Schimke

This week’s challenge was to write a story dealing with a deity. The Simulation Hypothesis has been on my mind the last few days (I’d blame Black Mirror, but I think it’s more likely my current Teaching Company lecture about the mysteries of time that really started this recent train of thought rolling.) I think that’s fairly obvious like two lines into this story.

Story after the break.

 

 

 

 

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Pulp Appeal: Clark Ashton Smith

I was very much a latecomer to Clark Ashton Smith. Of course I’d read some of his stories and poems in collections of Weird Tales and other horror anthologies, but I’d never sat down to read his work in earnest until a few years ago.

Broadswords and Blasters

Image result for clark ashton smith

Bow down: I am the emperor of dreams;
I crown me with the million-colored sun
Of secret worlds incredible, and take
Their trailing skies for vestment when I soar,
Throned on the mounting zenith, and illume
The spaceward-flown horizons infinite.

-The Hashish Eater – or- The Apocalypse of Evil

No discussion of classic pulp would be complete without mentioning Clark Ashton Smith (1893-1961), one of the leaders of the Weird Tales school, along with his contemporaries H.P. Lovecraft and Robert E. Howard, and arguably the one whose legacy hasn’t lasted to the extent of either of the other two.

Though the three never met, they all maintained correspondence with each other during the pulp golden age of the 1930s, and Smith helped contribute to what would later be called the Cthulhu mythos. In fact, Smith would go so far as to create a family tree of sorts, where Hastur is…

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The Hemadip: Wendig Challenge

This week’s challenge was to create a monster. I’m not sure the hemadip I’ve created counts, at least not in the story here, which, let’s be honest, is not really a story so much as some sort of glorified Wikipedia entry. I had a hard time with this prompt. Next time you come across a leech in the wild, I hope this little vignette crosses your mind.

Story after the break:

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Pulp Appeal: The Shadow

My newest Pulp Appeal column for Broadswords and Blasters.

Broadswords and Blasters

816uepmhbql“Hahahahahahaha. Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men? Ahahahahaha. The Shadow knows.” This is how the radio play always starts before the narrator introduces the episode. “The Shadow,” the narrator says, is “a man of mystery who strikes terror in the very souls of sharpsters, lawbreakers, and criminals.”

For people of now advancing age, The Shadow had a regular appointment with their much younger selves as their families sat in the living room on Sunday evenings and tuned in to the weekly radio serial. As a character for radio, The Shadow was given the mysterious power to cloud men’s’ minds so he could appear to be invisible, a trick he learned from Far Eastern hypnotists. The time when radio was dominant is a fascinating era of human history, in that audio productions were the shared experience for families of the day and the actual imagery was left…

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A Simple Stretch of Sand and Gravel: Wendig Challenge

The prompt this week was a pair of themes:

1. Doing a good thing sometimes means being evil.

2. The road to Hell is paved with good intentions.

In my narrator’s head, he thinks he’s doing the first. But that’s only what developed after I started riffing on the second. Story after the break

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Pulp Appeal: Flash Gordon

Flash Gordon was not a character I ever really appreciated. The camp, even from the early portrayals, simply didn’t rub me the right way. I’m not sure what it is exactly, because there’s tons of camp from other pulp era creations, but for whatever reason Flash Gordon just didn’t resonate.

But the soundtrack by Queen? That I can stand behind.

Broadswords and Blasters

Image result for flash gordonFlash Gordon has had a long and storied life. Starting as a comic strip, it’s been a movie serial, a live-action adaptation (twice), a cartoon series (three times), and most famously, the1980 film starring Sam Jones, Melody Anderson, Ornella Muti, Max von Sydow, Timothy Dalton, BRIAN BLESSED, Topol, and a blink and you miss it appearance by Richard O’Brien (better known as Riff Raff from The Rocky Horror Picture Show).

The plot is standard pulp fare. Ming the Merciless, having Earth brought his to attention by his counselor Klytus, decides to subject it to natural disasters (whether to actually test Earth or simply because he’s bored is left open). This has the unforeseen consequence of crashing the plane, in which are riding our hero Flash and his intrepid reporter/love interest Dale Arden, into the abode of mad scientist Karl Zokov. Zokov, of course, is the one that realizes the…

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Ibrahim and the Polong: Wendig Challenge

This week’s Wendig challenge was a random image search using Flickr’s built-in randomizer according to an algorithm they call “interestingness.” I was not impressed at first, even though my friend Matt showed me a pretty cool image he got. I had to refresh mine 4 times before I got something that wasn’t a bird. That’s not an exaggeration. Each click popped up 9 photos in a grid. I got 27 straight birds. Birds aren’t that interesting, people. They really aren’t.

So eventually I ended up with this really cool image of a chicken satay street vendor in Jakarta, uploaded by photographer Alex Newman. At first I ran with that. Then, while browsing other pictures of Indonesia on Flickr, I ran across the image to the right. My character sketch of a lonely street vendor on a rainy day in Jakarta evolved into the story of a lecherous man who is coaxed into even greater evil by a demonic spirit. Story is after the break. Enjoy.

 

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