In his house at R'lyeh, dead Cthulhu waits dreaming.

Archive for September, 2018

Pulp Appeal : Clash of the Titans (1981)

Broadswords and Blasters

(Editors’ Note: R.A. Goli is an Australian writer of horror, fantasy, erotic, and speculative short stories. In addition to writing, her interests include reading, gaming, the occasional walk, and annoying her dog, two cats, and husband. Her short story collection Unfettered is currently available at Lulu. Her fantasy novella, The Eighth Dwarf is available at Amazon and Fantasia Divinity MagazineCheck out her numerous short story publications at her  website https://ragoliauthor.wordpress.com/ or stalk her on Facebook)

Clash of the Titans is an epic tale of Olympian gods, mythological monsters and heroic mortals. Released in 1981, it stars Laurence Olivier as Zeus (Spartacus, 1960), Harry Hamlin as Perseus, (who later goes on to star in LA LAW), Maggie Smith as Thetis (Downton Abbey), and Ursula Andress as Aphrodite (who only has one line).

The movie opens with Acrisius, King of Argos, condemning his daughter, Danae and her infant son…

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Pulp Consumption: Strange Economics

Today I talk about a new anthology of speculative fiction, Strange Economics.

Broadswords and Blasters

41XhWcD-mDLAbout a year ago, before we published David F. Shultz’s story “Jerold’s Stand” in Issue 5, Shultz ran a Kickstarter for a collection of science fiction and fantasy called Strange Economics. The concept of the collection was to marry the sf/f genres to explicit examinations of economic principles, and then to couple those stories with examinations by real world economists and discussion questions that readers could use as jumping off points to talk about economics with others. The collection was successfully funded and the fruits of that Kickstarter finally hit the presses after a small delay.[1]

The collection contains 23 stories of varying genres that have economic principles as major plot points, an afterword that examines economics in science fiction, and a selection of probing, open-ended questions about the included stories.

Each story is its own self-contained world, exploring one quirk or another about the current economic systems…

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