In his house at R'lyeh, dead Cthulhu waits dreaming.

Archive for July, 2018

Pulp Consumption: Jules de Grandin

Seabury Quinn’s Jules de Grandin – a racist French Sherlock Holmes living in New Jersey and investigating the occult.

Broadswords and Blasters

51721TMPfuL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_Last month Horror on the Links, a collection of Seabury Quinn’s detective stories featuring Jules de Grandin, went on sale on Amazon for an amazingly low price. As a fan of Weird Tales and pulp fiction in general, of course I’d heard of Quinn, but his works are hard to find and have been out of print for awhile. The book starts with a little essay, as most of these collections do, which goes over the history of Quinn’s works and the rationale for why they’ve fallen out of favor while Howard and Lovecraft saw their fame grow. The fact is Quinn was more in demand at the time of the pulp heyday, and more of the magazine covers featured his works than either of his more famous contemporaries.

For those not familiar with the character, as I was not until reading this book, Jules de Grandin is a…

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Issue 6 is Now Available!

Issue 6 was just published and it has some great stories! Check out this summary and then go buy it. Support your indie publishers!

Broadswords and Blasters

Issue 6 is out now!

Broadswords and Blasters Issue 6: Pulp Magazine with Modern Sensibilities (Volume 2) by [Gomez, Matthew X., Walton, Robert, Rose, Rie Sheridan, Furman, Adam S., Hansson, Marcus, Cole, Catherine J., Graves, J.D., Mason, Jared]

Okay, so if all you do is follow the blog, you might think once a week articles on pulp (and pulp adjacent) properties might be all we do. Not the case though! We also put out a quarterly magazine, featuring at least seven stories of action and adventure and running the gamut of genres.

Issue 6 (currently available on Amazon in both digital and dead tree format), dropped this past Friday and features some of the best writing you can find anywhere.

“The Ogre’s Secret” by Robert Walton gets us kicked off in the right way with a nail biting mountain-climbing excursion. Definitely a different sort of Viking tale, but one that will have you holding your breath… and maybe laughing a bit as well.

“Marshal Marshall Meets the Mechanical Marauder” is an Old West Steampunk tale of a robber in search of one…

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Pulp Consumption: Playback

Broadswords and Blasters

RaymondChandler_Playback

Raymond Chandler is one of the foundational authors of noir. His Philip Marlowe is the quintessential hardboiled private investigator, a character Chandler rode until Marlowe seemed to become a pastiche of himself. This is not to say the acclaim Chandler derived in his career was unwarranted, but the pressure took its toll the author, and in his later years he became cantankerous and hard to work with, partly because he’d been taken advantage of (or so he felt) by the film industry and partly because he was a sour, curmudgeonly man. It didn’t help that he was also an alcoholic.

All of his novels, bar one, were filmed in one incarnation or another. The Big Sleep is the most famous as it established him on the pulp fiction scene, and the film version with Humphrey Bogart is as iconic as Bogart’s turn as Sam Spade, the PI creation of Dashiell…

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